The developing 7 dangerous holiday foods for dogs

The holidays are upon us and that means it’s time to embark in some culinary delight, but take caution. While these treats may be delectable for you, some can be dangerous for your dog! Keeping your dog away from these common holiday foods will help keep your pet safe and keep you out of the Vet’s office.  Chocolate this may be common knowledge for most pet owners, but in case you didn’t know, chocolate contains ingredients known as theobromine and theophylline. Both of which can be fatal for dogs and the caffeine…

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Why do our dogs eat grass?

Another team of researchers at the University of California, Davis conducted three separate surveys. Their hypothesis was, “Most plant eating in dogs is associated with illness or a dietary deficiency and that ingestion of plant material is usually followed within a few minutes by vomiting.” First Survey – Veterinary Students Sample size = 25 All students reported that their companion dogs ate grass Zero reported signs of illness before the grass-eating event Two students said that their dogs frequently vomited afterwards Second Survey – Teaching Hospital Clients Sample size =…

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You can fight fleas and ticks with common household products

    “Fleas and ticks carry a multitude of diseases that can be transmitted to both pets and human – Lyme Disease, Tapeworms, and Cat Scratch Fever, just to name a few. Needless to say, these nasty pests can cause much discomfort in both humans and their pets. The first step to flea and tick prevention is to ensure that you and your pet build up your immune systems with a natural diet.” Many dogs frequently suffer from insect bites, especially the more active breeds that spend a lot of…

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PLEASE, READ THE LABEL (the numbers do not lie)

  In today’s ever-changing world, it is extremely important to be aware of what is included in your dog’s diet. That means reading and understanding the ingredient panel on the bag of pet food that you are feeding…just as you would hopefully read and understand a nutritional label on the back of any package of food that you buy for yourself and your family. It’s shocking to know that for more than 100 years, the general public has been sold pet food made from rejected human waste products. The tide…

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How to add Omega 3 fish oils to your dog’s diet the right way

  We all know fish oil is a good thing for our dogs right? After all, fish oils have a super anti-inflammatory effect on the body, reducing your dogs joint pain, allergy symptoms and can even fight against cancer! But before you add that fish oil to your dog’s next meal, there’s something you need to be aware of … The EPA and DHA in fish oil are highly unsaturated. That means they have a love of double carbon bonds. Why is that important? Because those double carbon bonds make…

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Daily Advice: My neighbor is complaining that my dog barks all day when I am at work. Why?

Good question! Unlike humans, dogs cannot get into cars and drive to work each day. Most of the time, they are left at home all alone whilst their humans do this (go to work, that is). What is worse is when the owners of the dog rarely spend any time with it, even when they are home. This creates a dog that is even more frustrated due to utter boredom and will find ways of relieving this. To get a better idea, let’s look at the day in the eyes…

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3 tips for choosing quality dog treats

    1. Make sure the treats are made from fresh, whole foods, and not inferior ingredients. One dead giveaway: if you can pronounce each ingredient with no problem, that’s a good sign! 2. Find out whether the ingredients are being sourced from the USA. Stay away from ingredients coming from China or products being manufactured in China. One way pet food manufacturers try and trick pet parents is that they will source and manufacture their products in China but pack and ship in the United States so they can…

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How long can you leave a dog by himself?

The answer depends on the pet’s age, temperament, and activity level. A laid-back Lab, especially one with a few years under his belt, might relax on the sofa all day, then greet his owner at the door, tail wagging. A more energetic canine — say, a young terrier — may quickly grow bored and find mischievous ways to entertain himself, like chewing shoes or treating neighbors to a bark-a-thon. Every dog handles solo time differently. Having said this, most dog experts recommend three hours for a puppy and six hours…

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